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Hi, all I have a 2005 Zetec 2.0 TDCi. I think the handbrake maybe over adjusted as the lever only comes up a few clicks and there doesn't seem to be much freewheel in the car if on an incline or if i try to push the car, the brakes sonetime squel as well especially on pull away.

Can anybody tell me how to adjust the handbrake on the C Max?

Cheers
 

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The handbrake is self adjusting so sounds to me that brake caliper pistons haven't been fully retracted when placing new pads?

If you're handbrake is too loose it should be resolved by numerous repeated handbrake actions (make sure you let the rattle roll, so only push the knob when unlocking!). No result you'll have to check your pads for exccesive wear, if not, check cables and conduits.
 

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May be a good idea, if you haven't done it already to check your brake fluid level in the reservoir, just to be on the safe side.

When I replaced my front pads, even though i took fluid out of the reservoir to compensate for retracting the caliper cylinders, the brakes were rubbing slightly, so i did have to remove more and the problem stopped.


Edited by: xenonman
 

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xenonman said:
Have you had any pads replaced lately, check your brake fluid level as it might be overfilled.
Handbrake doesn't use brake fluid and an overfill would effect all wheels (fronts first).
 

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What effect will you have if the brake fluid is overfilled? It is not very easy to determine the level as you cannot see through the plastic reservoir on mine, and I have just replaced the front pads. In my mind surely pushing the pistons back will only raise the fluid to its original level. Or am I missing something here......?
 

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Chris said:
What effect will you have if the brake fluid is overfilled? It is not very easy to determine the level as you cannot see through the plastic reservoir on mine, and I have just replaced the front pads. In my mind surely pushing the pistons back will only raise the fluid to its original level. Or am I missing something here......?
Basically, none. It's just a reservoir and has a min level so there's always enough fluid when your pads wear out, has a max so there won't be any spill when the fluid heats (bubbles) or when fitting new pads (mostly because of the aggressive nature of the brake fluid). Unless your brake fluid has been filled before you changed your pads, (or somewhere in the past) an overfill would be rare. Still, it should have none effect on the breaking itself. Did you only do the front pads or the rears to? <?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" /><O:p></O:p>Edited by: JohanVG
 

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I only did the front, I am going to pick up a caliper tool and do the rears in the next couple of weeks.
 

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Enough is enough.
This forum is all about helping people and also to learn and understand the workings of the car.
All off topic commentshave beenremoved.
Edited by: lawe
 

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Chris said:
What effect will you have if the brake fluid is overfilled? It is not very easy to determine the level as you cannot see through the plastic reservoir on mine, and I have just replaced the front pads. In my mind surely pushing the pistons back will only raise the fluid to its original level. Or am I missing something here......?
The reservoir could be overfilled when you change your pads after retracting your caliper cylinder, if you have added extra brake fluid because the pads were very worn. If you don't remove enough excess fluid it can put extra pressure on the system seals when the fluid expands as it gets hot through braking.
You might find a puddle of fluid on the floor but you may notice the brakes binding before this as the extra pressure will tend to push the caliper pistons out, in turn pushing the brake pads onto the disc involuntarily.
 

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xenonman said:
The reservoir could be overfilled when you change your pads after retracting your caliper cylinder, if you have added extra brake fluid because the pads were very worn. If you don't remove enough excess fluid it can put extra pressure on the system seals when the fluid expands as it gets hot through braking.
You might find a puddle of fluid on the floor but you may notice the brakes binding before this as the extra pressure will tend to push the caliper pistons out, in turn pushing the brake pads onto the disc involuntarily.
Don't know where you get your info but, again, not true. Even if you could provide the system with that much pressure simply by retracting the calliper pistons, you wouldn't be able to refit the calliper unless you're hammering it on. The tiny hole in the reservoir lid would have spilled the extra amount of fluid, and so release extra pressure, before you'd gotten the wheels back on and in worst case, after a short drive. The only way to put a ‘meaningful amount' of pressure on the system is by charging brake fluid into the system with brake bleeding equipment and something blocking the tiny whole in the reservoir lid. <?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" />
Even more, brake fluid doesn't expand when it gets hot. It does boil at a certain degree.
Heat can never put extra pressure on the system, but less pressure, as boiling break fluid creates bubbles which can be compressed very easy.
 

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Let me explain.

I changed the pads on the front which were very worn, only 2mm left on them
Because the pads had worn right down the brake fluid in the reservoir had gone below minimum, so about 2 weeks before I put the new pads on, I topped up the fluid to the max mark in the reservoir.
When I did the pads 2 weeks later, before I pushed the caliper pistons back in, I knew the fluid would rise and refill the reservoir so I undid the cap and syringed some fluid out.
I then retracted the pistons right back into the caliper and then syringed more fluid out of the res because it had gone over the max mark and was almost spilling over the brim.
All was reassembled with the new pads and the level of fluid was checked in the res, which was spot on, so screwed cap on the res, pumped the brakes a couple of times and set off back home.

Approx 2 miles into the trip home, I realised that something wasn't right with the brakes because the pads had started to rub on the discs, so when I arrived home I checked the fluid level which had risen right the top of the res, I then syringed more fluid out back down to the max mark, took the car for a quick spin and the problem had gone, therefore my info has come from an actual live experience that happened when I did the pad change.
 

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JohanVG said:
xenonman said:
Have you had any pads replaced lately, check your brake fluid level as it might be overfilled.
Handbrake doesn't use brake fluid and an overfill would effect all wheels (fronts first).
One other thing, in your reply to Chris, who asked what effect would an overfill of fluid have on the system, you stated basically none but in the reply to my post you said above that an overfill would affect all wheels (fronts first)

If you could expand on that it might avoid confusion.
 

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This might help you adjust the parking brake

Parking Brake Cable Adjustment (126620)

µ 1. Remove the parking brake control boot.

2. Release the parking brake.

µ 3. Loosen the parking brake cable adjustment nut to the end of the thread.

4. Make sure the parking brake cable is correctly located.

5. CAUTION:
Do not exceed the specified torque. Failure to follow this instruction will cause damage to the parking brake cable thread.

CAUTION:
Do not exceed 23 rotations of the adjustment nut. Failure to follow this instruction will cause damage to the parking brake cable thread.

Note:
Make sure the parking brake control is fully released.

Note:
Before carrying out the adjustment to a new or relocated parking brake cable, settle the parking brake system.

Settle the parking brake system in four stages.

l Stage 1: Tighten the adjustment nut to 2 Nm.

l Stage 2: Raise the parking brake control twelve notches.

l Stage 3: Fully release the parking brake control.

l Stage 4: Loosen the adjustment nut to the end of the thread.

6. Note:
Make sure the parking brake control is fully released.

Adjust the parking brake cable in four stages.

l Stage 1: Insert a 0.7 mm feeler gauge between the parking brake lever and the brake caliper abutment on both sides.

l Stage 2: With the aid of another technician, tighten the adjustment nut until movement is observed on one of parking brake levers.

l Stage 3: Remove the feeler gauges.

l Stage 4: Rotate the rear wheels and check for brake drag. If brake drag is felt, loosen the parking brake cable adjustment nut to the end of the thread, clean the parking brake cables and repeat the adjustment procedure.

7. Install the parking brake control boot.
 

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Believe it or not, but you had coincidence at your side. Changing pads or discs will always cause the mechanical parts to adjust as it's impossible to refit the parts exact the way they were. Probably, in your case, a piston or the calipers moving parts, fought some friction to get to the point of running smooth. No matter how detailed you are, how precise the appliance of copper grease, refitting causes the moving parts having to re-find their way. Usually that just means ‘not running smooth' the first few braking attempts, sometimes it takes a bit more effort and in rare cases the caliper has to be dismounted again.<?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:eek:ffice:eek:ffice" />
I replied to Chris with basically none, because there's only one way to get pressure on the system without pedal movement and that is by using brake bleeding equipment, the other way around, and with a air tight reservoir. Some systems are really difficult to de-air (don't know the proper term), even with brake bleeding equipment. If so, you can try to use it the other way around, by plugging the pressured fluid to the calliper nipple and sending the fluid upwards (the natural way for air to go, but usually more messy). Only if you leave the reservoir cap on and the pressure relieve is blocked, you can provide the system with pressure overload (closing the nipple while feeding pressured oil). Only if that's the case, the pressure will command the break valve, which will command the calliper pistons, fronts first.
Ps: like this way of communicating much better!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the input Gents,

I took the plunge and decided to jack the car up and spin each wheel and see if anything was binding, whilst taking a look at the calipers I noticed the pads were all nearly new (recently serviced by Frauds). The front N/S was binding badly so I took the wheel off and removed the caliper were upon I found the piston was stuck after much persuassion with a large G clamp it finally returned to the caliper.
I pumped the pedal a number of times and checked that the piston was moving out and then pushed it back in and it appeared to be free and easy, so I put the wheel back on and hey presto the car now free wheels and will roll when on an incline. The fuel consumption has improved slighty but not a great amount but that must be something else, only downside of this all is that I've found the rear N/S tyre to be on the limit which means more money


I really must be more observant when buying a car


Thanks once again.
 

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The handbrake is self adjusting so sounds to me that brake caliper pistons haven't been fully retracted when placing new pads?

If you're handbrake is too loose it should be resolved by numerous repeated handbrake actions (make sure you let the rattle roll, so only push the knob when unlocking!). No result you'll have to check your pads for excces
 

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Will this be the same my handbrake worked perfectly before I changed rear pads on ford cmax 2011 I wound piston clock wise both till I could not wind in so had room for pads changed correct then handbrake don't work
I wound piston all the way back far as it allowed me
 
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